Indigenous Homes Initiative Applicant's Guide

PDF Version (PDF, 352KB)

Table of Contents

 

Message from the Indigenous Steering Committee

Indigenous Homes Innovation Initiatve Steeting Committee
From left to right: Sean Willy, Will Goodon, Pamela Glode-Desrochers, Marcel Lawson-Swain, Dawn Madahbee Leach. Terry Audla is not pictured.

We are honoured to lead this important initiative. We agreed to participate because we share a passion for community service. We recognize that while this initiative cannot address all housing needs, it can generate valuable new ideas about new ways to raise capital, and to design, build and maintain homes that meet the specific needs of Indigenous communities. This is about supporting great ideas from our communities.

The Indigenous Homes Innovation Initiative is based on a simple yet powerful idea: that the best solutions come from those who live the problem every day. Residents of Indigenous communities understand the housing-related challenges they face. The Initiative aims to tap into this understanding and inspire Indigenous peoples to propose and develop effective solutions. We believe that your ideas can and will make a difference.

To be eligible for funding, ideas must relate to housing in some way, and they must come from and serve an Indigenous community. There are no other requirements. We will fund ideas that come from all Indigenous communities— First Nation, Inuit, Métis Nation—of all sizes and in all regions of the country—urban, rural, remote, on and off reserve. Our goal is to find ways to make it easier for Indigenous peoples to live in safe, appropriate homes.

We are all excited by the opportunity to make progress on an important issue and humbled to serve Indigenous communities across Canada. We look forward to receiving your ideas. Together, we can make a difference.

Message from the Minister of Indigenous Services

The Honourable Seamus O’Regan, Minister of Indigenous Services

I am pleased to help launch the Indigenous Homes Innovation Initiative.

The Initiative adopts new approaches in several significant ways: it is led by a Steering Committee comprised of accomplished Indigenous professionals with relevant expertise. This initiative goes beyond existing housing programs, and emphasizes community priorities, innovative ideas and new partnerships. It also supports the refinement of proposals and concepts that have yet to be fully developed. Through a process known as the Accelerator, promising projects will secure the partners or services needed to succeed.

The Initiative is also part of the Government of Canada’s larger, sustained effort to reduce overcrowding, improve building quality, and address housing shortages in Indigenous communities. We have made significant investments in Indigenous and Northern housing - more than $2.5 billion since 2016.

We recognize that funding for immediate needs and testing of new approaches are needed to achieve results. The Government of Canada is determined to identify and support effective, Indigenous-led solutions to housing issues and to accelerate effective change.

That is why the Initiative aims to accelerate effective change by inspiring and harnessing Indigenous innovation and knowledge. It will fund projects that balance traditional ways with contemporary realities and that improve the quality of life experienced by one or more Indigenous communities.

I look forward to learning about, and to learning from, the ideas submitted by applicants.

The Honourable Seamus O’Regan
Minister of Indigenous Services

Do you have an innovative housing idea for rural, urban or remote Indigenous communities? Apply for the Indigenous Homes Innovation Initiative

Why are we launching the Indigenous Homes Innovation Initiative?

We know that there are many innovative housing ideas in Indigenous communities. The Initiative aims to find and support First Nation, Inuit or Métis Nation innovators who have housing ideas for rural, urban and remote Indigenous communities.

What is the Initiative?

The Indigenous Homes Innovation Initiative supports ideas that can lead to better homes or living spaces for Indigenous communities. The Initiative funds both the development of innovative ideas and the implementation of projects led by Indigenous individuals, organizations, businesses and communities. The Initiative is designed to work alongside and support other public, private, non-profit and community-led efforts to improve housing for Indigenous peoples.

What does the Initiative hope to achieve?

We hope the Initiative will:

  • deliver social and economic benefits to Indigenous communities (e.g. transitional housing for youth at risk)
  • take a collaborative approach by establishing new partnerships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities and organizations, including private and not-for-profit sectors
  • implement various sizes and types of projects in a range of communities—large and small, on and off reserve, remote and urban—across the country, and
  • share lessons learned from implemented projects.

What makes someone an innovator in Indigenous housing?

An innovator is someone with new ideas, designs or building techniques for effective, sustainable or culturally inspired living spaces for Indigenous peoples.

Is being an innovator the only requirement to participate in the Initiative?

No. To be eligible, innovators must be:

  • an individual of First Nation, Inuit or Métis Nation heritage; OR
  • an Indigenous representative of a First Nation, Inuit or Métis Nation government; OR
  • an Indigenous representative of a First Nation-, Inuit- or Métis Nation-owned and operated private or not-for-profit entity.

One or more individuals of First Nation, Inuit or Métis Nation heritage, representatives of First Nation, Inuit or Métis Nation governments or Indigenous representative of First Nation-, Inuit- or Métis Nation-owned or operated private or not-for-profit entities may partner on an application.

What types of ideas are eligible?

Your housing idea must meet three requirements:

  1. It must fall under one of six focus areas:
    • Traditional First Nation, Inuit or Métis Nation building styles and techniques
    • Using the home for empowerment, capacity building and support for local businesses
    • Support for vulnerable populations
    • Culturally-inspired urban spaces for First Nation, Inuit and Métis Nation people
    • Safety, security, and accessibility
    • Energy independence and efficiency
  2. It must be innovative by introducing new ideas, designs or building techniques for effective, sustainable or culturally inspired living spaces for Indigenous peoples.
  3. It must be led by a First Nations, Inuit or Métis Nation applicant:
    • On or off reserve
    • In a rural, urban or remote area
    • In any region of the country

Who will evaluate ideas?

An Indigenous Steering Committee leads the Initiative with the support of the Government of Canada. The Committee will review and evaluate all eligible ideas.

Who are the members of the Indigenous Steering Committee?

The Committee is composed of prominent Indigenous individuals from across Canada. They have been thoughtfully selected for their expertise and experience (To learn more about the Steering Committee members see Annex B).

How do you apply?

You can complete and submit your application on the Impact Canada Challenge Platform https://impact.canada.ca/en/challenges/indigenous-homes.

Alternatively, you may print, complete and send your application form by courier to our mailing address:

Indigenous Homes Innovation Initiative Secretariat
10 rue Wellington, Suite 2513
Gatineau, QC K1A 0H4

The deadline for applications is August 1, 2019 (11:59 p.m., PST).

Why should you apply to the Initiative?

The Initiative is a unique opportunity to access financial and technical support to develop and implement an innovative housing or living space idea in your community. It is also intended to provide professional development opportunities for the lead applicant.

What funding is available?

If you are selected to participate in the Accelerator, you will receive funding and support services worth up to $350,000. The Indigenous Steering Committee will determine exact amounts based on the size, complexity and level of development of your idea.

If you successfully complete the Accelerator and the Indigenous Steering Committee selects your project for implementation, you will receive up to $2 million for construction. The Indigenous Steering Committee will determine exact amounts based on the size and complexity of your idea.

What is the timeline of the Initiative?

  • Launch and call for ideas open: April 11, 2019
  • Application deadline: August 1, 2019
  • First-stage screening: up to 24 applicants selected for Accelerator
  • Accelerator period: Beginning fall 2019
  • Second-stage screening:15 to 24 projects selected for implementation: beginning spring 2020
  • Project implementation period: 2020-2023
  • Lessons learned and knowledge sharing: 2022-2023

What happens if your idea gets selected?

The Initiative has four stages:

1.  First-stage Screening and Evaluation

Indigenous Services Canada will screen all applications for basic eligibility and forward those that are eligible to the Indigenous Steering Committee. The Committee will review, evaluate and recommend up to 24 Indigenous innovators to the Minister of Indigenous Services for Accelerator participation.

The Committee will consider five criteria (See Annex A for more detail):

  • Project idea and purpose
  • Project innovation
  • Project sustainability
  • Local empowerment and capacity building (during the construction process)
  • Community engagement

2. Accelerator Period

During the Accelerator period, up to 24 Indigenous innovators will spend up to 18 months working with experts on refining their ideas. The Indigenous Steering Committee will determine the exact level of support based on the size, complexity and level of development of the innovators’ ideas.

Each innovator will receive funding and support services worth up to $350,000, which includes:

  • A bursary so the innovator can focus their time on their idea;
  • Guidance and advice from experts in business, social services, design, construction and law;
  • Costs for workspace and for travel to meetings and community visits; and
  • Support of an Indigenous mentor to guide the innovator as they refine their idea.

The Accelerator will also help innovators find additional funds and partners to support their ideas.

Innovators that successfully complete the Accelerator period and develop their ideas into fully implementable proposals will move to the second-stage screening.

3.  Second-stage Screening and Project Implementation Period

The Indigenous Steering Committee will review and evaluate fully developed proposals that successfully complete the Accelerator. The Committee will select between 15 and 24 projects and allocate up to $2 million to each innovation project. The Committee will determine the exact number of projects and the exact amount of funding based on the size, complexity and their potential to achieve the goals of the Initiative.

The innovators will receive funding through contribution agreements with Indigenous Services Canada.

4. Lessons Learned and Knowledge Sharing

The Initiative is an opportunity to gather and analyze new approaches and share lessons learned with Indigenous communities across Canada.

Throughout the Initiative, the Indigenous Steering Committee and Indigenous Services Canada will seek to identify information that can foster the success of future projects related to Indigenous homes.

Once funded projects are implemented, the innovators will receive additional funding to review their projects and share lessons learned with Indigenous communities and others across Canada.

Where can you get more information about the Initiative?

For additional information, email aadnc.housing-innovation-logement.aandc@canada.ca

Annex A: Application Form Instructions

Here are some general instructions for filling out your application:

  • Please take time to read all application requirements before starting your submission.
  • Applications must be submitted in either English or French.
  • Please ensure that your responses are as comprehensive as possible.
  • All fields are required and we encourage you to use all available space in each field.
  • You do not need to have a fully developed proposal to apply. The intention of the Initiative is to support ideas that require refinement rather than those that are ready for construction.
  • Once you have submitted the application, you will no longer be able to make changes.
  • Applications are due no later than Thursday, August 1, 2019 at 11:59 p.m., P.S.T.
  • If you have any questions or concerns, please contact Indigenous Services Canada at aadnc.housing-innovation-logement.aandc@canada.ca

Part A: Eligibility

Part A of the application will be used to validate that you as an applicant and your idea as a project are eligible. Part A of the application will not be evaluated.

To be eligible for this Initiative, you must:

  • answer YES to questions 1,2, and 3; and
  • select one focus area from the list in question 3.

 Question 1:

 Are you an eligible applicant for the Initiative? (Yes/No)

Tips

  • An eligible applicant must be one or a combination of the following:
    • An individual of First Nation, Inuit or Métis Nation heritage; OR
    • A representative of a First Nation, Inuit or Métis Nation government; OR
    • An Indigenous representative of a First Nation-, Inuit- or Métis Nation- owned and operated private or not-for-profit entity

One or more individuals of First Nations, Inuit or Métis Nation heritage, representatives of First Nations, Inuit or Métis Nation governments or Indigenous representatives of First Nations-, Inuit- or  Métis Nation-owned or operated private or not-for-profit entities may partner on an application.

Question 2:

Is your idea eligible for the Initiative? (Yes/No)

Tips

  • An eligible idea must lead directly to the construction of a home or temporary living space in an Indigenous community.
  • An Indigenous community is a First Nation, Inuit or Métis Nation community
    • on or off reserve
    • in a rural, urban or remote area
    • in any region of the country

Question 3:

Will your idea for improving homes contribute to one of the Initiative’s focus areas listed below? (Yes/No)

Which focus area? Please select the most relevant.

  • Traditional First Nation, Inuit or Métis Nation building styles and techniques
  • Using the home for empowerment, capacity building and support for local businesses
  • Support for vulnerable populations
  • Culturally-inspired urban spaces for First Nation, Inuit and Métis Nation peoples
  • Safety, security, and accessibility
  • Energy independence and efficiency

Tips

To be eligible for support, your idea must contribute to one of the Initiative’s focus areas. If it relates to more than one focus area, please select the most relevant one:

Traditional First Nations, Inuit or Métis Nation building styles and techniques

Eligible ideas could focus on:

  • Promoting traditional community activities and cultural empowerment
  • Using local materials in housing design
  • Improving building quality

A possible example: A log-built home integrating traditional design, local material and the latest available internal systems

Using the home for empowerment, capacity building, support for local businesses

Eligible ideas could focus on:

  • Establishing innovative financing and procurement models
  • Improving access to capital
  • Increasing community self-determination and economic resilience
  • Supporting skill development

A possible example: Building that blends residential and commercial uses.

Support for vulnerable populations

Eligible ideas could focus on:

  • Creating temporary and permanent housing options for vulnerable populations
  • Decreasing overcrowding

Possible examples: Emergency and transitional housing for those fleeing family violence.

Culturally-inspired urban spaces for First Nation, Inuit and Métis Nation peoples

Eligible ideas could focus on:

  • Fostering health, wellness, and a sense of community away from home

Possible examples: Student housing; homes for grandparents caring for their grandchildren

Safety, security and accessibility

Eligible ideas could focus on:

  • Enabling people of all ages and abilities to stay in their community
  • Supporting “aging in place” and Elders’ independence
  • Introducing accessible house designs and housing adaptations

A possible example: Accessible Elders’ lodge

Energy independence and efficiency

Eligible ideas could focus on:

  • Reducing reliance on diesel fuel for heat and power
  • Decreasing energy costs and environmental impacts
  • Developing housing designs based on geographic needs and impacts of climate change

A possible example: An affordable Net Zero Energy house design for independent living in remote communities.

Part B: Project Idea

  • Part B of the application will be evaluated.
  • The Indigenous Steering Committee will evaluate all eligible proposals based on the information in Part B to determine which innovators will participate in the Accelerator.
  • The evaluation criteria and weighting are provided for your reference.
  • Each proposal will be assigned a score of up to 100 points based on the answers provided.
  • Questions 4 and 5 are not scored and are for context only.

Project Context

Question 4:

In which community will your project take place? Please select all that apply.

  • First Nation community off reserve
  • First Nation community on reserve
  • Inuit community
  • Métis Nation community within homelands
  • Métis Nation community away from homelands
  • Urban area
  • Rural area
  • Remote area
  • Other (please explain)

Tips

  • One of the goals of this Initiative is to implement various sizes and types of projects in a range of communities—large and small, on and off reserve, remote and urban—across the country.
  • The Steering Committee is simply looking to know where your idea fits and to ensure they support ideas across the entire country.

Question 5:

Please describe the community that will benefit from your project. Please describe the community housing need you aim to address.

This section should:

  • Describe the community that will benefit from your project.
  • Include information to describe your understanding of the community housing need.
  • Focus on the issue your idea specifically aims to address.

Tips 

Community is at the heart of effective ideas and impacts. Context on the community and its needs and priorities will help the Steering Committee understand your idea better.

Project Idea and Purpose (Questions 6-10 for total 35/100)

Question 6:

How will your idea address this housing need? How will the community benefit from your idea?

This section should:

  • Introduce your idea and its purpose
  • Demonstrate how your idea will address the community housing need you described.
  • Include specific goals you hope to achieve by implementing your idea.
  • Explain how the community will benefit from your idea.

Tips 

  • When you answer this question, assume that the Indigenous Steering Committee members are not familiar with technical aspects of your project. Your goal is to convince the Committee members that your idea will address the community housing need.

Question 7:

Please indicate how your idea will contribute to the focus area you selected in Part A, Question 3.

This section should: 

  • Demonstrate how your idea links to the focus area you selected.
  • Explain how your idea will make an impact in the focus area you selected. 

Tips

Funding ideas that have an impact on these focus areas is the main purpose of the Initiative. Be sure to describe clearly, step by step, how your idea links to the focus area you selected.

Question 8:

Which group below is most likely to directly benefit from your idea? Please select your top three:

  • Youth
  • Women
  • Men
  • Families
  • Elders
  • Single adults
  • Persons with disabilities
  • Lone parents
  • People who identify as LGBTQ2+
  • People fleeing violence or trauma
  • Youth aging out of foster care
  • People released from care, hospitals, institutions or halfway houses
  • Indigenous workers
  • Indigenous businesses
  • Other (please explain)

Tips 

One of the goals of the Initiative is to implement innovative projects that will address the needs of various groups. Clearly describe how your idea will address these needs.

Question 9: 

What type of housing does your project include? Please select your top three:

  • Single free-standing unit
  • Multi-unit
  • A combination of single free-standing and multi-unit
  • Emergency shelter
  • Transitional housing
  • Social housing
  • Affordable rental housing
  • Market rental housing
  • Affordable home ownership
  • Market home ownership
  • Addition of living spaces to multipurpose buildings
  • Other (please explain)

Tips 

We have heard that that one-size-fits-all approach will not work, and that all communities have particular types of housing needs. Indicating the type of housing you want to build will help the Steering Committee better understand your idea.

Question 10:

Please describe your idea.

This section should: 

  • Describe your idea and the activities/steps needed to build your project.
  • Include both the number of homes to be built (or improved) and the number of people who would benefit.

Evaluation criteria:

The Steering Committee will be looking for the following when they review questions 6 – 10:

  • To what extent are your idea and purpose relevant to the housing need faced by the community?
  • To what extent does the proposal have the potential to help the community address their housing need?
  • How well does the proposal address one or more of the focus areas of the Indigenous Homes Innovation Initiative?
  • To what extent does the proposal have the potential to impact the community in one of the focus areas of the Indigenous Homes Innovation Initiative?
  • To what extent is the housing type proposed by the applicant appropriate for addressing the community housing need?
  • How clear and thorough is the description of applicant’s project idea and purpose?

Project Innovation (Total of 20/100)

Question 11:

How is your project innovative?

This section should:

  • Explain how your approach to addressing the community housing need is different from existing approaches
  • Describe how your approach is original to the community
  • Highlight any innovative features of the housing designs you aim to develop and any other information that demonstrates innovation in your approach
  • Describe how your idea brings back traditions into housing design and construction.

Tips

The Steering Committee is looking for innovative ideas. Projects that do not already exist, or that would be unlikely to receive funding under current programming, are likely to receive a higher score than ideas that have been tried before.

Evaluation criteria:

The Steering Committee will be looking for the following when they assess question 11:

  • To what extent is your approach to addressing the community housing different from existing approaches?
  • Is your project idea original to the community?

How creative is the idea in question?

Project Sustainability (Total of 20/100)

Question 12:

How will your project be financially sustainable over the long term?

Please select all that apply, and describe each individually below:

  • The project will generate revenue.
  • The project will make the house last longer.
  • The project will lower maintenance costs.
  • The project will have external financing or revenue.
  • Other (please explain)

This section should: 

  • Clearly explain your strategy for making the home or living space last as long as possible.
  • Describe how you are going to fund the upkeep of the home or living space over the long term.

Tips: 

  • Be as detailed as you can and make sure to provide an answer for each of the options you have selected above.
  • Precise numbers and estimates are not needed. If you are screened into the Accelerator, you will be receiving support for this
  • Even if you don’t have specific financing or revenue set aside, we encourage you to still describe a strategy for finding outside sources of funds 

Evaluation criteria: 

The Steering Committee will be looking for the following when they assess question 12: 

  • How realistic is the strategy proposed for sustaining the project when the contribution agreement with Indigenous Services Canada ends? This should include one or more of the following:
    • A strategy to lower the cost of maintenance
    • A way to extend the life cycle of a home or living space
    • A plan for financing the maintenance costs over the lifecycle of the home or living space
    • A way to use the project to generate revenue
    • An external source of funds or financing, or a plan for securing additional funds or financing

Project Support for Local Empowerment and Community Capacity (Total of 20/100)

Question 13:

How will the process you use for your project support local talent, build community capacity and use local resources?

Please select all that apply, and describe each individually below:

  • The project will use local construction materials
  • The project will employ workers from the community
  • The project will train community members
  • The project will involve local business in project
  • Other (please explain)

This section should: 

  • Discuss any opportunities to involve people, businesses or materials in or near the community
  • Estimate, as much as possible, the impact your project will have (e.g. number of jobs, amount of material to be purchased)
  • Explain how this will help the community (e.g., a local business will grow)

Tips:

  • Think of any and all opportunities to work locally and be as specific as possible
  • You do not need to have any business deals or hiring done yet – the Committee only wants to know about your plan at this point.

Evaluation criteria: 

The Steering Committee will be looking for the following when they assess question 14:

  • To what extent would the project involve local talent and local resources, including estimated numbers of people affected and estimated volume of resources or financial impact?

Community Engagement (5/100)

Question 14:

Please describe how the community has shaped your proposal. Please describe your plans for continuing to engage and involve them in your proposal going forward. 

This section should: 

  • Include descriptions of any community engagements on topics related to your idea.
  • Explain if the engagements were inclusive and representative of community diversity.
  • Highlight the feedback you heard at the engagements.
  • Describe how you integrated community feedback and community philosophies, practices or traditions into your proposal.
  • Describe your plans for continuing to engage and involve the community in your project idea going forward.

Tips: 

  • One of the goals of the Indigenous Homes Innovation Initiative is to fund ideas that come from the community and so we want to know how your community was involved.
  • Reference any existing documents you may have that show your idea is a priority (e.g. Comprehensive Community Plan). 
  • At this stage in the application process community engagement is a relatively smaller portion of the assessment. However, if your project is funded for construction, it will need a community to welcome it before it is ready to be built. 

Evaluation criteria:

  • To what extent does the application show community involvement in project planning?
  • Have engagements with community residents on topics related to the proposal taken place?
  • Were engagements inclusive and representative of community diversity? (e.g. involving multiple groups like youth and Elders)
  • Have you incorporated community residents’ diverse feedback into the proposal?
  • Have you integrated community philosophies, practices or traditions into proposal?
  • Do you have a plan to keep engaging the community going forward?

Part C: Support and Feasibility Considerations

There is no word limit for this section.

  • Part C of the application will not be evaluated.
  • However, you must answer all questions in Part C. If you do not answer all questions in Part C, you application will be incomplete.
  • The Indigenous Steering Committee will review the information in Part C to determine funding and service package you require (ONLY for ideas that are successfully screened through Part A and Part B).
  • Please note that projects at all levels of readiness (excluding those that are already ready for construction) will be considered. However, we encourage you to provide as many details as you can.
  • Make sure to include as much technical detail as you have so far for your project (such as detailed drawings or designs).

Question 15:

Please describe the current state of development of your idea.

This section should:

  • Describe the current state of development of your idea
  • Include details on any preliminary work done to date such as sketches, detailed design, feasibility studies or contract documents (architectural or engineering plans)
  • Highlight any research you have done on similar projects previously implemented elsewhere

Tips

  • You do not need to have a fully developed proposal. The intention of the Initiative is to support ideas that require refinement rather than those that are ready for construction. 
  • You may also add a drawing or image that represents your idea.

Question 16: 

Please describe the support you need to further develop your idea. 

This section should: 

  • Include details on any support you need to further develop your idea such as guidance from an Elder; design, architecture, engineering; project management, business planning, and financial planning. 

Tips 

This information will help the Steering Committee tailor specific Accelerator funding and support services. Please be as specific as possible, including number and type of people you need to work with and the estimated number of hours or weeks.

Question 17:

Please describe the budget you estimate that you need, including:

  • The estimated cost to further develop your idea; and
  • The estimated cost of construction

This section should: 

  • Describe the estimated budget you need to further develop your idea
  • Describe the estimated budget you need to build your project
  • Explain how you determined the budget
  • List the specific items in your requested budget
  • List any other sources, funding or programs that will contribute to the budget of your project 

Tips

  • Please include as many details as you have.
  • However, do not worry about being exact – the Accelerator will provide support to refine your budget
  • Keep in mind that the Accelerator will provide up to $350,000 in funding and support services
  • Keep in mind that those ideas that pass the second stage screening will receive up to $2,000,000 for construction

Question 18: 

The Steering Committee may decide to match or combine projects in order to maximize the impact of funding. In some cases, the Committee may decide to merge and fund two projects they would not otherwise fund on their own. If the opportunity is available, would you be open to being matched with another applicant? (please select one of the following):

  • I would consider partnering with another applicant.
  • I am not willing to partner with another applicant.

Tips

While you are still eligible for the Initiative regardless of which box you select above, it is to your advantage to remain open to partnering with another applicant because it increases the likelihood of being funded.

Question 19:

Please describe any challenges you anticipate in your project idea going forward. 

This section should: 

  • Highlight all aspects of your project idea that give you the most concern such as challenges related to local building codes or environmental regulations.
  • Highlight anything else that might be extra difficult to accomplish.

Tips 

  • We strongly encourage you to share your thoughts in this section. Every project has challenges – pointing them out shows you have thought a lot about your idea.

Question 20: 

Please identify any additional critical considerations you would like to bring to the attention of the Indigenous Steering Committee.

Annex B: Biographies of Steering Committee Members

Pamela Glode-Desrochers, Executive Director, Mi'kmaw Native Friendship Centre (Co-chair)

Pamela Glode-Desrochers is a Mi’kmaw woman with a deep understanding of Aboriginal perspectives and a passion for helping urban Aboriginal people access support and guidance in areas such as social, health, justice and education that will meaningfully contribute to a safer, healthier and more vibrant urban Aboriginal community. For the last 22 years, she has worked for the Mi'kmaw Native Friendship Centre. Mrs. Glode-Desrochers is also an Executive Member of the Urban Aboriginal Knowledge Network (UAKN) Atlantic, a member of the Aboriginal Circle that guides the UAKN, and on the Board of Directors of the National Association of Friendship Centres. In 2017, she earned a Sovereign’s Medal for Volunteers for outstanding Indigenous leadership.

Will Goodon, Minister for Housing and Property Management, Manitoba Metis Federation (Co-chair)

Will Goodon dedicates his career to a combination of community service and entrepreneurship. For many years, he worked at Goodon Industries, a firm founded by his father in 1963 and later one of western Canada’s largest agricultural-construction companies. Mr. Goodon was twice elected to the Manitoba Métis Federation as a provincial board representative for Southwest Region and twice appointed Minister of Housing and Property Management. He also played an instrumental role in the recognition of Métis harvesting rights, winning a lengthy court case against a charge that he had illegally shot a ring-neck duck in southwestern Manitoba. In his spare time, Will Goodon likes to hunt and cut firewood with his dad at the log cabin the two of them built in the Turtle Mountains.

Dawn Madahbee Leach, General Manager, Waubetek Business Development Corporation

A member of Aundeck Omni Kaning First Nation in Ontario, Dawn Madahbee Leach served as the inaugural Chair of her community’s Housing Committee for ten years. She earned a Bachelor’s degree in political science and worked as a consultant for several First Nation communities. Ms. Madahbee Leach has managed the Waubetek Business Development Corporation for the past 30 years and currently serves as Vice-Chair of the National Aboriginal Economic Development Board.  She also serves on the Boards of Peace Hills Trust and the Northern Policy Institute.  She participates on several federal and provincial advisory committees. 

Marcel Lawson-Swain, LL.B, CEO, Lu’ma Native Housing Society

Marcel is part Ojibwe, Cree and Métis. After completing degrees in law and business, he was called to the bar by the Law Society of British Columbia and practiced law in Vancouver. For the last 32 years, he has served as CEO of a group of companies that includes Lu’ma Native Housing Society, Lu’ma Native BCH Housing Society, First Funds Society, Lu’ma Medical Centre Society, the Aboriginal Land Trust and the Lu’ma Development Management LTD. Mr. Lawson-Swain’s work on Indigenous issues—particularly housing and homelessness—has earned him numerous accolades and awards. A founding member of the National Aboriginal Housing Association and the Metro Vancouver Aboriginal Executive Council, he is also a past director of the Median Credit Union, one of Canada’s first Indigenous financial institutions.

Sean Willy, President and CEO, Des Nedhe Development

With roots in the Denesuline and Metis communities, Sean Willy grew up in mining communities across the Canadian Shield. After 20 years in the resource industry, his extensive experience in executive leadership, community development and human resources earned him an appointment to the position of Chief Executive Officer of Des Nedhe Development in 2017. Previously, Sean Willy served as co-chair of the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business and chair of the Northern Career Quest. He continues to work tirelessly with global Indigenous communities on economic development strategies. He and his wife Melissa live with their two children in Saskatoon.

Terry Audla, President and CEO, Nunavut Housing Corporation

The son of high-Arctic exiles relocated in the early 1950s, Terry Audla was born in Frobisher Bay (now Iqaluit) and raised in Resolute Bay. Mr. Audla has dedicated his career to the implementation of Inuit land-claims agreements and to increasing economic opportunities for Inuit and Nunavut residents. Today, he is responsible for more than 5,500 homes and public-housing units in Nunavut and works toward filling the gaps in the housing continuum across the Territory. From 2012 to 2015, Mr. Audla served as President and National Inuit Leader of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami. He is married to Terri Lynn Potter and their family includes four children. 

Annex C: Terms and Conditions

Applicants to the Initiative agree to the following when submitting their application:

  • Applicants agree to comply with all applicable laws.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate ownership of or permission to use any intellectual property used in the Initiative.
  • All funding amounts are in Canadian dollars.
  • The Minister of Indigenous Services has the sole discretion to cancel this initiative or any part thereof at any time.

Privacy Statement 

This statement outlines the purposes for the collection and use of personal information.

We will use personal information for administering, assessing and determining eligibility for the program to which you are applying. Only information needed to administer, assess, determine eligibility, and connect applicants with other organizations who provide funding and support for innovation will be requested. Collection, use, and disclosure of personal information are in accordance with the Privacy Act. The authority to collect and use personal information for Indigenous Homes Innovation Initiative is derived from OIC 2017-1465 and required for your participation. 

We may share the personal information you provide us with other Government of Canada departments and initiatives, provincial, territorial or municipal governments, educational institutions, and for-profit and not-for-profit organizations to connect participants, as may be described in the standard personal information bank PSU 938 Outreach Activities. In some cases, information may be disclosed without your consent pursuant to subsection 8(2) of the Privacy Act.

As stated in the Privacy Act, you have the right to access the personal information we collect about you and request changes to incorrect information.   Contact your Regional Office (http://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1100100016936/1100100016940) to notify us about incorrect information or contact the INAC Public Enquiries by phone at 1-800-567-9604 for general enquiries. If you require clarification about this statement, contact our Privacy Coordinator at 819-997-8277. For more information on privacy issues and the Privacy Act in general, you may consult the Privacy Commissioner at 1-800-282-1376.

Before receiving funding, the applicant will be required to sign a consent and release statement in the form (see Section E of the application form).

Intellectual Property

It is the responsibility of the applicant to ensure that it owns, or obtains a license 9 to use, any intellectual property that it incorporates into a project that will receive funding under the Indigenous Homes Innovation Initiative.  While the Government of Canada will be providing project funding to an applicant, the Government of Canada will not be legally responsible to any party in the event that the applicant uses intellectual property which it has no right to use.  Intellectual property includes, but is not limited to, the following: patents, industrial designs, trademarks, copyright, and trade secrets.

Accordingly, before receiving funding, the applicant will be required to sign an indemnity in the form (see Section D of the application form).